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Thread: 22-250 versus 243

  1. #1
    Beginner Reloader WVHunter129's Avatar
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    Default 22-250 versus 243

    I am thinking about getting another bolt action rifle. The two calibers that I am considering is either a 22-250 or a 243.

    Would like some input on your thoughts about both of these calibers.

    I have know people who use a 243 to deer hunt that have lost deer. But, I know that it really all depends on where you place your shot with the 243.

    I am just wanting a rifle that I can varmit hunt with, but maybe use it for other game as well.

    Thanks in advance.
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    Default 243 win.

    WVhunter,
    If you want a rifle for both deer and varmint hunting I would stick with the 243 and shoot light bullets for vamints and shoot deer with 100 grns.The 55's are fast and very flat shooting.
    I don't shoot deer with the 22-250 but I hear a lot of people are doing it.
    they say 1 shoot but I would have to see it to believe it.
    The 22-250 is a great cartridge for varmint hunting very accurate I would like a couple more myself.The forty grns are pushing over 4100 fps and are very flat out to 500 yrds.and plants the ground hogs.Very seldem exit.the critter takes all the energy.

  3. #3
    Beginner Reloader WVHunter129's Avatar
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    Thanks dave22250 for the information. Well to tell the truth I don't think I would attempt to hunt a deer with a 22-250, but for coyotes and ground hogs I thought that it would be fun. I have three 30-06's and a 303 British so for deer I am covered. If I really wanted to I guess I could load up some light bullets for the 30-06, but I thought it would be nice to have another caliber.

    You know how us gun guys are...we have to have more toys...LOL

    Again thanks.
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    If you have good deer rifles already, there's no need to bother with a .243. It is a fine deer and black bear rifle, though, and those that badmouth the cartridge likely don't have much experience hunting deer with it. (Anyone can gutshoot with a case of buck fever or just lack of practice.) It also makes a good medium range varmint rifle, but there are better choices for smaller critters.
    The .22-250 is one of the best all around varmint cartridges in use today. There are a few with better ballistics, yes, but their brass isn't as easy to come by these days and expensive when it is. Mine takes woodchucks and coyotes out to 400yards without a problem. We can't hunt deer with them here, and I don't think I would want to either, though many do in states where it is legal to do so and speak highly of the 60gr Nosler Partitions for the job. With bullets from 40-60gr, you can tailor your loads to your quarry and range, though I shoot 55gr Sierra SBT's and BTHP's and zero for 200, hold over for longer ranges. It's inherently a very accurate cartridge, and should be capable of subMOA in a decent rifle even with factory loads. It can really reach its potential with careful handloads, though. We roll soda cans at 400yds for practice. A decent scope with a 40-50mm objective is a must (doesn't hurt if it's adjustable, too), and a good range finder can help a lot, especially in an unfamiliar location. Bipods for prone and shooting stix for sitting shots make life easier at longer ranges. The hottest loads aren't usually the most accurate, and barrel life is considerably longer with more moderate loads.
    If I can see it, I can hit it. Now, where did I put my glasses?

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    Default 243 win.

    Versifier,
    The 243 can be an excellent varmint rifle very fast and flat shooting. I also shot a 243 for ground hogs. I shot a 55 grain bal.tip at 4001 fps out of a crony and site in at 2 in. at 100 yds and I don't shoot out of the gound hog out to 375 yrds.My bal.program shows with a dead on at 100 yrds.I'm 27.1 in. low at 500 yds.thats mighty flat, a 22.250 is about 32.5 low at 500 with a 55 grn. traveling about 3700.

  6. #6
    Beginner Reloader WVHunter129's Avatar
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    Well whatever I get....and it looks more like a 22-250 it will have a mounted bipod on the stock and I will have a Tasco 6-24 x 42 Varmit scope mounted on it. That is the setup on my Remington Model 700 ADL 30-06. I know it sounds crazy to have such a scope on the 30-06 and the bipod, especially since it is my deer rifle. But, having the bipod on the 06 has really helped in my shooting. Since configuring the 06 with this setup I have taken two bucks in the past two years.

    Thanks again guys for your inputs.
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    Advanced Reloader C1PNR's Avatar
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    Talking

    Well, WVHunter129, it sounds like maybe you've made the decision to go with a 22-250. I think that's a good idea, since you already have a fine deer cartridge in that '06.

    I hope you do realize, though, that you are setting yourself up for a real tough decision down the road a piece.

    When it's time for the NEXT "new" rifle, what do you do? Is it a .243 or a .257??? Yeah, that's a tough one alright! Or maybe you just blast on by and opt for a 7mm Mag, or even a .300 Mag, or, MAYBE just go for it and get the .338 Mag!!

    I still don't have a 22-250, or a .338 Mag, although I am dickering for a pre 64 M70 in 375 H&H. That should handle my run ins with those ever dangerous sabretoothed Jackrabbits we have roaming the Idaho desert.

    The WOMAN I'm dealing with used it, with iron sights only, for many years of deer hunting. She told me she never had one get away after she put one into it! Neat older lady, and I believe her!
    Regards,

    WE

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    We have in our possession a mossberg .243 and a custom 22-250. Personally I like the bigger calibers for deer or bigger game. We've (we as in our family) have taken deer with a .270, .308, 7MM Mag, and .300 Weatherby Mag. All of which are great deer munchers. I know people think some of those are overkill, but they do the trick. The past 3 years I've hunted deer with my .300 weatherby mag and have been successful each year. The only buck i've shot at was the one I downed. I cannot say that with my .243. Granted I paid about $300 for it and about $2,300 for my .300 so accuracy is a little different.

    Anywho, I think for yotes and such the .243 would be about right. For smaller game, P-dogs and such, I would really recommend the 22-250. We took the 22-250 out last fall when we went on our bear hunting trip and we pounded a few p-dogs about 150+ yards out. Very accurate and fast. The ammo is pretty inexpensive to reload. Just a really fun plinker!

    Anywho, there's my .02 cents.

  9. #9
    Beginner Reloader WVHunter129's Avatar
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    Appreciate the input guys.

    When it comes to making up my mind I like to get all the facts, well as much as I can get, before I really make up my mind. OOOOOH NOOOOO I think my wife is rubbing off on me...can't make up my mind....HELP!

    Nah, really guys thanks. I do want to get something I will be happy with. I have heard that 22-250 barrels don't last long...something like 1800 to 2000 rounds and it is time for a new barrel. Well I don't think I will get that many shots, but if you go to the range a lot and then hunt groundhogs or yotes much I guess you could see that number fastly approach.

    HUMMMM more research is needed I think before I make up my mind...
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    Reloading King Oldbushman's Avatar
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    PHSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSST!: There's only one solution to your problem ............Get one of each


    Dave

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    A .22-250 won't eat barrels as fast as, for instance, a .220 Swift. That said, if you aren't shooting max loads, which generally aren't as accurate as when you back off a few hundred fps, then you will get great barrel life with either case. No reason you won't see well over 10,000 rounds. After 5000+ rounds through mine, there is no sign of throat erosion whatever, nor any loss of accuracy at all. Even if you are shooting barn burners, you should get at least 5000. What kills them are extended shooting sessions with very hot loads, and not letting the barrel cool off. That's one good reason why many p-dog hunters use two (or more) rifles at the same session. I don't often shoot more than a 50round box at a range session, and never more than four or five rounds when hunting varmints. A good heavy barrel helps to dissipate the heat better than a thin one, and a blued steel barrel has a longer working life than a stainless one.
    If I can see it, I can hit it. Now, where did I put my glasses?

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    Default one of each

    Bushman,
    You said it thats what I ended up doing "of course the wife wasn't happy" I ended up with a 223,22-250 imp, plus the 243,and they all have a job to do.Of course the 22-250 is the most accurate and gets shot the most.
    And as far as burning out the barrel "don't overheat the damn thing"thats the worst thing for it my 22-250 has a couple thousand rounds thur it and is still going strong and I do shoot some hot loads thru it.

  13. #13
    Beginner Reloader WVHunter129's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldbushman
    PHSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSST!: There's only one solution to your problem ............Get one of each


    Dave

    Oldbushman...now that's an idea...more TOYS!!!!
    We could always use more TOYS!!

    I will have to give that a thought...waiting on income tax to come in...I guess the wife won't mind if I keep it all to myself...
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  14. #14
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    I use a 22/250 in Scotland for shooting Roe deer, foxes and vermin. I have had no deer lost so far with 22/250. With correct bullet placement they usually go down on the spot! I used to use a 243 win. and had quite alot of deer running, sometimes up to 100 yards. I think bullet choice and placement will be your main concern, a good 55 grain soft point or hollow point bullet should put your deer down providing the distance is within reason. Although our Roe deer may only weigh up to 60lbs they are tough animals. In the past I know that the 22/250 was used by some hill stalkers in Scotland, before the law changed, for shooting Red deer, which could weigh up to 20+ stone. I feel the 22/250 is a bit more accurate than 243 but this is only my thoughts.

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    Reloading King Oldbushman's Avatar
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    G'day & welcome to the guide ! I'm wondering having heard a lot about youe Roe deer over there if they are what ,we call Fallow deer over here or if their two different species of Deer ?

    Dave

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    Hi Oldbushman, over here in Scotland we have both Roe and Fallow deer. Fallow are quite a bit larger and tougher than Roe. If you are interested please check out this web sight.

    www.bds.org.uk

    It has a brief desciption of all deer stalked in Britain.

    Stephen

  17. #17
    Reloading King Oldbushman's Avatar
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    Cheers for that Stephen ! That's a great site . Over here in SA Deer are considered a Feral pest & can be shot all year round ! WE had a get rich quick rage a couple of years ago with Deer farming .Like all things of this nature everyone got on the Band wagon & it went bust ! Now most "farmers" just shot out their deer & were done with it ! Up our way there was a Farmer who just let his go & they are now happily breeding in the mountains through out our area ! We snipe one off here & there for meat .They have no commercial value to me so they hold very little interest but they are all Fallow!

    Dave

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